At-Risk on Campus

Research:

At-Risk for University and College Faculty & Staff and At-Risk for College Students and Student Leaders are online and interactive training programs proven effective in changing attitudes, skills, and behaviors in several longitudinal studies. In addition, At-Risk for Students is listed in SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices. Both programs are also listed in the SPRC Best Practices Registry.

Large scale longitudinal studies were conducted for both courses. For At-Risk Faculty and Staff surveys were completed by 430 respondents at 63 institutions. For At-Risk College Students, 270 participants from 20 institutions were included in the analysis. In each study, participants completed questionnaires prior to and immediately following the online training. Participants then completed either a three-month, six-month or 12-month survey.

Both studies found statistically significant (p<.05) increases from pre- to post-training, and that those increases remained significant at all three follow-up points (3, 6 and 12-months). The findings strongly suggest that these courses had an immediate and enduring impact on improving user’s skills in identifying, approaching, and connecting students exhibiting signs of psychological distress. Specifically, the studies showed that substantial increases in the number of students approached and referred to support services:

  • At-Risk for Faculty and Staff - 47 percent increase in the number of students approached and 42 percent increase in referrals
  • At-Risk for College Students - 70 percent increase in number of students approached and 53 percent increase in referrals

Additionally, for At-Risk for College Students, the study also found a significant increase in the likelihood that users who took the simulation would seek out help if they begin to experience psychological distress. Survey results for both courses also showed that participants found the training to be easy to use, engaging, realistic, and helpful to them in getting timely help to at-risk students.

Images from Faculty & Staff Study
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