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Kognito's Assessment Team, led by Kognito's Co-Founder, Glenn Albright, Ph.D., has conducted a number of studies that analyze the impact of Kognito simulations on learners’ behavior, performance, attitudes, and knowledge. Among these studies are a randomized controlled trial, several quasi-experimental design studies, and several longitudinal studies using a repeated measures design. Provided below are links to several of these studies:


  1. Family of Heroes - A peer-reviewed, randomized controlled study found that Family of Heroes significantly increases military families' preparedness to recognize when their veteran is exhibiting signs of post-deployment, approach them to discuss their concerns, and motivate them to seek help. This study also found an increase in mental health service utilization by veterans whose family member had completed the training.

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  2. At-Risk Education Suite - This document provides a summary of five individual studies conducted to assess At-Risk for University and College Faculty, At-Risk for College Students, Veterans on Campus, At-Risk for High School Educators, and At-Risk for Middle School Educators

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  3. At-Risk in Primary Care - This research brief highlights preliminary findings from the implementation of this immersive learning experience among care providers in New York City. Results show significant increases in skill and motivation to screen patients for mental health and substance abuse disorders, conduct brief interventions, discuss treatment options, and refer patients to treatment. These results show the promise of integrating innovative technology-based solutions for primary care training in mental health screening, brief intervention and referral.

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  4. American Indian/Alaska Native Users of At-Risk Education Suite - This document provides the results of a study among 262 self-identified American Indian (AI) or Alaska Native (AN) participants who were part of a larger study that examined the impact of four gatekeeper training simulations included within the At-Risk Education Suite. The study found statistically significant gains in Total Gatekeeper Skills and Total Gatekeeper Self-Efficacy. Participants included AI or AN faculty, staff and students in institutions of higher education and school personnel in middle and high schools.

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  5. At-Risk for University and College Faculty - A longitudinal study among 430 faculty and staff at 63 institutions found that all dependent variables showed statistically significant increases from pre- to post-training, and that those increases remained significant at three, six, and twelve month follow-up points. Specifically, there was an increase of 47% in the average number of students approached by participants and 42% in the number referred by participants to support services.

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  6. At-Risk for College Students - A longitudinal study among 270 students at 20 institutions found that all dependent variables showed statistically significant (p<.05) increases from pre- to post-training, and that those increases remained significant at three-month follow-up point. These include significant increases in Gatekeeper Skills, in the likelihood students will self-refer, and in the number of fellow students participants connected with and referred to support services in the prior two academic months.

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  7. Veterans on Campus – A longitudinal study among 296 participants from 11 schools in eight states found statistically significant and lasting increases in a 3 month follow up in Gatekeeper Skills and Military Cultural Competency as well as substantial increases in the percentage of participants that reported an increase in the number of Veteran students they approached and referred to support services.

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  8. At-Risk for High School Educators – A longitudinal study among 216 high school teachers and personnel in 82 schools in five states found that all dependent variables showed statistically significant (p<.05) increases from pre-; to post-training, and that those increases remained significant at three-month follow-up point. These include significant increases in Gatekeeper Skills and in the number of students educators approached and referred to support services (average increase of 55%).

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  9. At-Risk for Middle School Educators - A longitudinal study among 114 educators at 20 schools in Texas and Alaska found that all dependent variables showed statistically significant increases from pre- to post-training, and that those increases remained significant at three month follow-up points. Significant changes included those in Gatekeeper Skills and in the number of students participants were concerned about, approached, and referred to support services during the prior two academic months.

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  10. At-Risk for College Students: 2011 Quasi-Experimental Design Study - A study with an experimental group (n=175) and a control group (n=79) of students at 10 institutions found that the experimental group reported greater increases in preparedness to recognize, approach, and refer students exhibiting signs of psychological distress.

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  11. At-Risk for High School Educators: 2011 Quasi-Experimental Study – A quasi-experimental study showed that, compared to a group of individuals who did not take training, those who underwent the training reported being more prepared to recognize, approach, and refer a student exhibiting signs of psychological distress.

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At-Risk for College Students, At-Risk for High School Educators, and Family of Heroes are now included in SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices.

For more information, take a demo, call us at 212-675-9234, or contact us here.

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